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Genealogy: Research, the Next Step

July 21, 2010

Start your Genealogy here https://gyia.wordpress.com/2010/06/23/genealogy-getting-started/

Are you ready for the next Genealogical step? Now that you have all of the important information from your living ancestors; and, you have picked their brain for information on your deceased relatives; and, you have all of that information entered into a computer data base, it is now time to poke around and find some more. Cyndislist has several sites and resources categorized and listed out for you.  CyndisList is on Facebook. Give familysearch a look over, it’s FREE. Use the LDS Family History Centers they are hear for more everyone’s use, FREE. Find one close to you.

Researching Vital Records From   http://www.pbs.org/kbyu/ancestors 

For more information, go to pbs.org and search genealogy or the Ancestors TV show

For obituaries and geneology forms http://www.obituarieshelp.org/index.html

URL: http://www.obituarieshelp.org/free_printable_blank_family_tree.html
Description:  Family tree templates available in PDF form. These free forms can be used to  create your own personal family tree

NOTE: I am not endorsing any website or product but merely providing the information that they exist, I put this together 6 years ago so some links might be dead just let me know, Thanks.

  Online Databases  
  What’s in Them Where to Find Them How to Use Them***  
  Almost always include:  Names and some additional information (e.g., date, place, spouse, etc.) of a collection of people  Ability to search by name, place and/or other keywords

  Information about the original source
May also include:

  Any of a variety of details about the people found in the database

  Scanned images of original documents or photos

For a list of searchable databases by category: http://CyndisList.com/database.htmSites Housing Multiple, Searchable Databases:
http://www.Rootsweb.com
http://www.familysearch.org
http:/www.Ancestry.com
http://www.genealogy.com
http://www.familytreemaker.com
  To find information about your ancestors in compiled resources (to be confirmed by searching original sources)  To speed your research by searching indexes of original sources (e.g., census, military)  To find submitters to contact and share information with

  To find others with your surname of interest in your area of interest (e.g., SSDI)

 
Vital RecordsDeath Records
What’s In Them Where to Find Them How to Use Them***
Almost always include:  Name  date of Death

  place of Death

May also include:

  age at death

  date and/or place of birth

  cause of death (although some states now black this information out)

  details about the length of illness

  exact time of death

  occupation and/or name of employer

  residence of the deceased

  whether single, married, widowed or divorced

  date and/or place of burial

  name (and possibly address) of undertaker

  signature of attending physician

  name (and sometimes address) of informant, frequently a surviving spouse, child or other close relative

  maiden name of deceased woman

  names of parents

  name of surviving spouse

  exact time of death

  how long in this country or location

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/
howto/w2w/w2welcom.htm
or
http://www.family
search.org/sg/If approximately 1900 or later:
the State Department of Health Services or Office of Vital Records as found in
http://www.vitalrec.com
or
http://www.vitalchek.comIf prior to 1900:
http://www.vitalchek.com
(for those states that began registration earlier than most or to find contact information for local agencies)
OR
State or county resources such as:
http://resources.rootsweb
.com/cgi-bin/townco.cgi
or
http://familysearch.org/Eng/
Library/FHLC/frameset_fhlc.asp

or
http://ancestry.com/search/ locality/main.htm
OR
State or local libraries or societies and/or compiled records for that locality as found in our Resource Guide.
In addition to solving the mystery of what happened to your ancestor, information on death records can help you:  find a birth date and/or place to research  find a maiden name for a woman

  find parents’ names to research

  identify the names of children, spouses, or other relatives to trace

  find cemetery or church records for the burial

  find an obituary or death notice

  find a newspaper account of a cause of death listed as “an accident” or “killed”

  find an approximate year of immigration or arrival in this locality

  develop a medical family history for your family

  determine which children belong to which mother in the case of multiple marriages

  find an address to seek in deeds or city directories, locate on maps, or narrow your search in an unindexed census

  identify employer records to pursue

Marriage Records
What’s In Them Where to Find Them How to Use Them***
Almost always include:  full names of bride and groom  date of the marriage

  county where the marriage took place

May also include:

  age at time of marriage

  date and/or place of birth for bride and groom

  names and birthplaces of the bride’s and groom’s parents

  names of the witnesses to the marriage, often relatives

  residence of the parties

  whether single, widowed or divorced

  age at time of marriage

  occupation

  church of marriage ceremony

  name of minister or priest

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/
howto/w2w/w2welcom.htm
or
http://www.family
search.org/sg/The local town or county courthouse as found in:
http://www.vitalrec.com
or
http://www.vitalchek.com
or state or county resources such as: http://resources.rootsweb
.com/cgi-bin/townco.cgi
or
http://familysearch.org/Eng/
Library/FHLC/frameset_fhlc.asp

or
http://ancestry.com/search/ locality/main.htmIf more recent:
the State Department of Health Services or Office of Vital Records as found in
http://www.vitalrec.com
or
http://www.vitalchek.com

If particulary early:
State or local libraries or societies and/or compiled records for that locality as found in our Resource Guide.

Information on marriage records can help you:  find a birth date and/or place to research for the bride and groom  find a maiden name for a woman

  find parents’ names (and possibly birth places) to research

  learn about previous marriages

  find a newspaper announcement

  find church records for the marriage

  determine which children belong to which mother in the case of multiple marriages

  learn about previous marriages

  find addresses to seek in deeds or city directories, locate on maps, or narrow your search in an unindexed census

Birth Records
What’s In Them Where to Find Them How to Use Them***
Almost always include:  name of child  gender of child

  race of child

  date of birth

  place of birth

  names of parents

May also include:

  maiden name of the mother

  ages of parents at the time of the birth

  birthplaces of parents

  occupation of the parents

  family residence address

  child’s order in the family

  hospital or name of attending physician or midwife

  exact time of birth

  maiden name of the mother

  physical description of the child

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/
howto/w2w/w2welcom.htm
or
http://www.family
search.org/sg/The local town or county courthouse as found in:
http://www.vitalrec.com
or
http://www.vitalchek.com
or state or county resources such as: http://resources.rootsweb
.com/cgi-bin/townco.cgi
or
http://familysearch.org/Eng/
Library/FHLC/frameset_fhlc.asp

or
http://ancestry.com/search/ locality/main.htmIf more recent:
the State Department of Health Services or Office of Vital Records as found in
http://www.vitalrec.com
or
http://www.vitalchek.com

If particulary early:
State or local libraries or societies and/or compiled records for that locality as found in our Resource Guide.

Information in birth records can help you:  find the names of the previous generation  find a maiden name for the mother

  find parents’ birthplaces

  find parents’ approximate years of birth

  find church or hospital records for the birth

  find a newspaper birth announcement

  determine which children belong to which mother in the case of multiple marriages

  find an address to seek in deeds or city directories, locate on maps, or narrow your search in an unindexed census

  identify employer records to pursue

             

 

TIME & MONEY the two great stumbling blocks to research.

Handout From Leisel Clayton (used with permission)

                Time management

                                Know how long things take… time them, you might be surprised.

                                Don’t forget prep time

                                Streamline by creating routines

                                Dovetail tasks

                                Analyze yourself:

                                                What works for you?

                                                When do you have the most energy to do things?

                                                How long can you keep focused at once?

                                Get it out of your head

                                Map out your hard landscape

                Priorities based

                                Start out by determining what matters most to you.

                                What are your main values?

                                Determine your roles.

                                In your life:

                                                what do you want to have?

                                                what do you want to do?

                                                what kind of person do you want to be?

                                Now, that you know your priorities, plan goals to further those priorities.

                                Goal planning page, monthly calendar page, weekly calendar page, daily pages

                                                Use a monthly calendar to note upcoming appointments.

                                                On a daily basis, note today’s appointments, create a list of things to do today,

                                                                prioritize your tasks, so that you know which ones are most important

                                                                for you to get done.

                4 Quadrants:

                                                Quadrant I            |              Quadrant II

                                                |

                                                Important              |              Important

                                                &                             |              but not

                                                Urgent                    |              Urgent

                                —————————-           |—————————-

                                                Quadrant III         |              Quadrant IV

                                                                                |

                                                Not important       |              Not important

                                                But                          |              and

                                                Urgent                    |              Not urgent

                                Keep up with Quadrant II tasks, try to avoid Quadrant III and IV activities.  Quadrant III

                                have the definite possibility of undermining your efforts… items there are usually brought

                                to you by other people, but they do nothing towards helping you achieve your goals and

                                support your values.

                Context based

                                Start out by emptying your head, and gathering all the papers/voice messages/etc. that

                                                generate tasks for you.

                                Organize all your thoughts and information into projects.  A project is anything that

                                                requires more than a single task to complete.

                                For each project, determine a next action.

                                Place all next actions onto context-based to-do lists.

                                Examples of contexts:

                                                @ Phone

                                                @ Computer

                                                While running errands

                                                @ Home

                                                @ Work

                                                @ Anywhere

                                Agendas – lists of things to talk about the next time you speak with someone

                                Calendars are for hard landscape items… things that must be done at or by a certain time,

                                                or else they might as well not be done.  The context lists are for everything else.

                                                Tasks are not prioritized, but when you are in a particular contextual setting, you

                                                do as many of the tasks from that context as you can get to.  The idea being, that

                                                it takes time and effort to switch from one mode to another, and that by doing all

                                                you can while in that mode, you accomplish more than if you have to switch

                                                back and forth between modes.

                                Weekly review!

                                                Loose Papers

                                                Process Your Notes

                                                Review any “Journal/Notes” Decide and enter action items, projects,

                                                                waiting‑fors, etc. as appropriate.

                                                Review Previous Calendar Data

                                                Review past calendar in detail for remaining action items, reference data, etc.

                                                                Transfer into the active system.

                                                Review upcoming calendar events ‑ long and short term.

                                                                Capture actions triggered.

                                                Empty Your Head – put in writing (in appropriate categories) any new projects,

                                                                action items, waiting‑fors, someday‑maybes, etc not yet captured.

                                                Review Action Lists Mark off completed actions.

                                                                Review for reminders of further action steps to record.

                                                Review Waiting‑For List

                                                Record appropriate actions for any needed follow‑up. Check off received ones.

                                                Review Project (and Larger Outcome) Lists. 

                                                                Evaluate status of projects, goals, and outcomes,

                                                                                Ensure at least one current action item on each.

                                                                Browse through work‑in‑progress support material

                                                                                Trigger new actions, completions, waiting‑for’s, etc.

                                                Review Any Relevant Checklists. Use as a trigger for any new actions.

                                                Review Someday/Maybe List. 

                                                                Review for any projects which may now have become active

                                                                                Transfer to “Projects.”

                                                                Delete items no longer of interest.

                Time map based

                                Analyze

                                                What’s Working and What’s not?

                                                What are your time management preferences?

                                                What are your energy cycles and sources?

                                Four tiers to defining the life you want

                                                Know your major life categories

                                                Develop big-picture goals

                                                Select activities to help you achieve those goals

                                                Choose daily tasks/to-dos that make up your selected activities.

                                Create your time map.  A time map is a schedule that is subdivided into “activity zones”

                                                that correspond to your life categories and contain all the tasks on your to-do

                                                list.  Essentially, you create time buckets for the types of tasks you will do.

                SPACE

                                                Sort potential tasks by category

                                                Purge whatever tasks you can

                                                Assign a Home to tasks you have decided to do

                                                Containerize tasks to keep them within the time allotted

                                                Equalize – refine, maintain, and adapt your schedule.

                Resources

                                Books:

                                Franklin Covey  (variety) priorities based time management system

                                Getting Things Done by David Allen

                                                context based time management system

                                Time Management from the Inside Out by Julie Morgenstern

                                                time map time management system

                                                help to analyze why things are not working out and how to fix them

                                Software that might help you manage your time:

                                Life Balance (PC and/or Palm OS PDA’s)

                                                – http://www.llamagraphics.com

                                                – 30 day free trial

                                                – To-do list organizer.  Has features not available in any other program.

                                Above and Beyond (PC only)

                                – http://www.1soft.com/

                                Shadow Plan (primarily Palm OS PDA’s)

                                – http://www.codejedi.com

                                – Versatile, feature-rich outliner.

                                – Free to try before you buy.

                                HandyShopper (Palm OS PDA’s)

                                                – http://www.palmgear.com (search for HandyShopper)

                                                – Freeware…shopping lists, inventories, to context based to-do lists, and more.

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